It’s A Small Town

“It’s a Small Town” is a refreshingly contemporary treatment of mostly standards along with a handful of new songs that can stand most proudly alongside the older and more venerated…

Album art for It’s A Small Town

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About It’s A Small Town…

“It’s a Small Town” is a refreshingly contemporary treatment of mostly standards along with a handful of new songs that can stand most proudly alongside the older and more venerated songs.

Although romantic love is the theme of most of these songs, it’s Stacy’s sense of yearning in her voice, that vulnerability and longing that line her vocals that touches and moves the listener.

The CD could almost be subtitled “Country Goes Broadway/ Hollywood” as the majority of the songwriters represented on this disc constitute the heavyweight composers of mid and slightly later 20th century American popular song who worked the east and west coast vineyards: Rodgers, Hart, Porter, Berlin, Weill, Mancini.

Though blessed with a lyric coloratura and trained with a degree in music, Stacy’s voice has no hint of the diva or the academy. She sings honestly, from her heart, without histrionics and the unnecessary pyrotechnics, paying attention to the lyrics and allowing the stories to speak for themselves. It’s clear that her heart and voice are firmly planted on the street corners of Williams and Berlin (that is to say, Hank and Irving.)

Track Listing

1 Blue Skies
2 Lazy Afternoon
3 So In Love
4 It's A Small Town
5 Two For The Road
6 In My Arms
7 My Funny Valentine
8 I Can See Clearly Now
9 New Words
10 What Good Would The Moon Be?
11 My Little World
12 Another Tuesday
13 My Romance
14 Young At Heart

Praise for It’s A Small Town…

  • “One of the true tests of any cabaret performer is how much of their off-stage personality they can bring on stage with them. In the case of country-jazz thrush Stacy Sullivan, she scores high marks and passed that test with flying colors. With a warm smile that could light up Times Square, and a wry sense of humor mixed with her open-faced honesty, the gal’s a winner. The sad news is that her local cabaret appearances are few and far between. As a proud member of the talented Sullivan family from Oklahoma, headed by big sister KT Sullivan, she lives in California and works mostly on the West Coast. Hopefully, that will change and we’ll be seeing more of her on our shores.
    In her very recent shows at Metropolitan Room at Gotham, where she appeared with musical director Tedd Firth and bassist David Fincke, she offered an eclectic program that was, at times, a mix of country fun and Manhattan sophisticate. With several prominent cabaret artists turning out to support her in the audience, this younger Sullivan breezed through an hour that fused her country roots with savvy jazz stylings. As in the past, she brought the country flavor to some well chosen evergreens like “How Little We Know” (Mercer/ Carmichael) and “So In Love” (Porter). With her medium sized cottony alto and homespun good looks, the lady is also no stranger to classic standards, and managed to bring a new sensibility to them, fused with more than a hint of ironic and emotional musical cross currents that are intriguing. At times, her warm voice was reminiscent of some contemporary country ladies like Trisha Yearwood. Hers is not a big act or a grand act, but a sweet, warm, totally engaging act that works because she makes you feel like she’s your kid sister up there in the spotlight just singing her heart out. In that regard, she’s one of those quintessential performers whose love of singing communicates so well, that it gives the listener pleasure just to participate in the process. Stacy Sullivan embraces a room and reveals her self with a sincerity every other singer could learn from-especially in a town over-run with over-rated divas who have lots to learn about the art of cabaret performing. No frills. No gimmicks. Just an honest singer with a lot to offer. The eclectic show had many memorable moments. Particular standouts included a tender reading of the riveting story song “Another Tuesday,” by Tim Di Pasqua and Tom Andersen. With luck, this will pop up on her next album. Her natural heartfelt delivery perfectly embraced this poignant tale of a mother hearing from the child she gave up for adoption. Amanda McBroom’s “Dreaming” was given a simple treatment that scored high marks. Blossom Dearie’s “I LikeYou, You’re Nice,” was done with appropriate minimalist treatment befitting the legendary songwriter. Bob Dylan’s “Simple Twist of Fate,” which she described as “the perfect get-him-back song” projected a folksy incisiveness that recalled Joan Baez. I would suggest more folk material, as she does it so well. An Introspective “Where Do You Start?” by Alan and Marilyn Bergman, became a heartfelt expression of romantic obsession that she handled with style. Many of her songs moved safely from songs of yearning, to deeper expressions of empathy and love. Mastering some lighter fare would enhance her set, as she has a wonderful sense of whimsy and wry humor when she banters with her audience. On a country song written by brother Tim Sullivan, she handles a fusion of country blues with a sly jazz twist that worked in spades. Closing with a happy “Blue Skies” (Berlin), she once again showed the makings of a real jazzer, as she gave every simple word a purposeful intention. While Sullivan needs to build her performing profile in Manhattan, she has the potential to become one of cabaret’s leading ladies. After all, this is a lady with no attitude and less ego- a rarity in show business.”

    — John Hoglund, Cabaret Exchange
  • “It was party time at the Metropolitan Room, filled with friends, family and other Sullivan enthusiasts who had seen Stacy perform alone and with her family for the previous two days at venues as diverse as Carnegie Hall and Birdland. This was Stacy’s time to shine, and with Tedd Firth at the piano and Matthew Schneider on bass, she made the most of it. The song list varied from Hoagy Carmichael to Bob Dylan. Blessed with a wry sense of humor in addition to her come-hither voice, Sullivan delivered “Let’s Call the Whole Thing Off” in an Oklahoma twang clashing with cultured city-bred pronunciations. She was in top form with Alan Menken and Stephen Schwartz’ “Cold Enough to Snow” and a couple of heartstring-tuggers, Amanda McBroom’s “Dreaming” and “Another Tuesday” by Tom Andersen and Tim Di Pasqua.”

    — Cabaret Scenes Magazine
  • “TAKE THE CREAM OF THE CROP OF SONGWRITERS MIX IN SOME BLUES, BALLADS, ROCK, COUNTRY AND A VOICE THAT CAN HANDLE ALL THOSE FORMATS AND YOU HAVE STACY SULLIVAN’S STUNNING CD…”WEST ON 40″ ON THE LML LABEL. STACY’S VOICE POURS OUT SINCERITY WITH EVERY BREATH AND SHE DELIVERS LYRICS LIKE THEY WERE WRITTEN JUST FOR HER. “WEST ON 40″ SHOWS THAT STACY CAN SING ANY SONG WITH DEPTH, IMAGINATION AND FEELING. THIS ONE IS A WINNER ALL THE WAY.”

    — Jim Stone, Big Band Swing
  • “An Actress, singer and natural charmer, Stacy Sullivan brings it all together with ‘My Romance: A Country Cabaret’. If you’re within a day’s drive of New York, change your plans if necessary, but don’t miss this show..”

    — Cabaret Scenes Magazine
  • “Stacy Sullivan brings something completely new to cabaret…the American Poplular Song that she loves so dearly tilted slightly country in honor of her Oklahoma roots. She proves that these classic songs can adapt to any style when interpreted from the heart with a voice that is pure gold…You’re in for a great ride!”

    — Andrea Marcovicci
  • “‘My Romance: A Country Cabaret’ is a fantastic take on songs from the Great American Songbook. The Arrangements: fabulous! The musicians: fabulous! Stacy Sullivan: FABULOUS!”

    — Shane Mathews, “Helen’s Hideaway”
  • “Whether it’s her haunting version of “So in Love” or her get-on-your-feet-and dance cover of “You’d Be Surprised”, Stacy Sullivan entertains like no other cabaret vocalist I have ever seen or heard. She has the ability to make an audience feel as it the’ve sat down for a cozy evening of friendship and song.”

    — Michael Seel, “The Theatre @ Boston Court”
  • “There were some great shows during Cabaret Convention Week, 2004. The best of the best was Stacy Sullivan’s ‘My Romance: A Country Cabaret’.”

    — MNY.Com
  • “a journey filled with heart and humor”

    — Cabaret Hotline
  • “crystalline purity … a blend of intelligence and passion”

    — LA Times
  • “Tantalizingly beautiful with a voice to match…Stacy Sullivan can shift from crystal cllear to slightly smoky. She is both sensitive and faithful to the lyrics, delivered as if they were written expressly for her.”

    — Peter Leavy, “Cabaret Scenes Magazine”
  • “A voice scented with honey and orange blossonms.”

    — Polly Warfield, “Backstage”
  • “A stunning beauty with a voice to match and the ability to make the audience laugh and cry”

    — Les Traub, Cabaret Scenes Magazine
  • “Stacy Sullivan has an engaging approach to lyrics that make every song compelling. She has a beautiful, melodic voice, warm phrasing…a refreshing treat, unblemished and tender.”

    — John Hoglund, “Backstage”

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About

Stacy Sullivan, winner of the Backstage Bistro Award and the MAC Award for Outstanding Female New York Debut, has appeared in venues across the country, from Jazz at Lincoln Center in New York to the Ford Theatre in Hollywood. Joined…