Waiting For The Glaciers To Melt

Grandmas Song Choir: Scott Coulter, Kristen Coury, Margaret Dorn, Lina Koutrakos, Eric Millegan, Michelle Peeler David Raleigh, Johnny Rodgers, and Brian Wilson Recorded at Masque Sound, NYC Engineer: Jeremy Harris…

Album art for Waiting For The Glaciers To Melt

Share this post…

About Waiting For The Glaciers To Melt…

Grandmas Song

Choir: Scott Coulter, Kristen Coury, Margaret Dorn, Lina Koutrakos, Eric Millegan, Michelle Peeler David Raleigh, Johnny Rodgers, and Brian Wilson Recorded at Masque Sound, NYC

Engineer: Jeremy Harris

Home quartet: Scott Coulter, BLG, Johnny Rodgers, and Brian Wilson

Mandolin: Barry Mitterhoff

Recorded at Masque Sound, NYC

Engineer: Jeremy Harris

Dad and Me | Inevitable | Icons

Background vocals: Johnny Rodgers and BLG

Dad and Me

Violin (Fiddle): Deni Bonet

I Miss You* | Inevitable | Calm

Cello: Wolfram Koessel

Violin: Eviya Ozolins Kiger*

Violin: Una Tone

Recorded at Mix-o-lydian, Lafayette, New Jersey

Engineer: Don Sternecker

Mastered by Phillip Klum at Jigsaw Sound, NYC

Photography: Russell Baer (Santa Monica)

In studio photograph: Kristen Coury

Art Direction & Package Design: Doug Haverty

for Art & Soul Design (LosAngeles)

Track Listing

Praise for Waiting For The Glaciers To Melt…

  • “We can never have too many recordings of daring new musical theater works. Anything that can jolt us from the stupor induced by cast albums of dumbed-down, overblown shows and anemic revivals is welcome — and there is special cause for celebration when a CD as arresting as Brian LaneGreen’s Waiting for the Glaciers to Melt (LML Music) is released.

    Glaciers has the lofty goal of raising and enriching the human spirit. (You won’t find anything like that in Spamalot or Dirty Rotten Scoundrels.) Green approaches the material with a revivalist fervor that is ideally matched by Johnny Rodgers, who provided the string arrangements, assisted Green with the vocal arrangements, and whose band accompanies the songs. Almost every track is imbued with the sound of Southern spirituals or a feeling of isolated longing; occasionally, the two are combined to unique effect. Though religion is only rarely mentioned overtly in the 10 tracks on this disc, the devotional subtext echoes loud and clear throughout.

    Each number is rife with emotion, from the laid-back, youthful reflection of “Dad and Me” and the cautious hopefulness of “I Know” to the terrifying uncertainty of the title song. These songs span the spectrum of human feelings and memories, focusing most intently on growing up and its associated fears. This disc’s first number is its most powerful, almost the work’s theme statement — “Grandma’s Song” is an inspirational lesson in which the refrain replete with avian imagery (“If you have a broken wing / And you just don’t have the strength to get up and try / There’s no use in worrying / No, give it time, and once again you’ll reach the sky / And you’ll be stronger the next time you fly.”) only increases in power and significance with each repetition. By the time Green and his chorus of backup singers swell into the song’s final moments, it’s difficult to stop the chills or the tears…

    These songs are among the most inventive and emotionally perceptive musical theater songs written in the past several years…the music simply soars.

    The curious may try to recreate the running order of the songs as heard in the 2003 production of Waiting for the Glaciers to Melt at the Midtown International Theatre Festival, by playing the tracks in the following order: 7, 3, 1, 2, 8, 6, 5, 4, then 10. (“Joy,” heard in track 9, was not in the Fringe production.) But only about half of the show’s songs are on the recording, so it’s not possible to fully capture the experience of this unusual and captivating piece. Still, what’s here demonstrates the brilliance and care of Green’s craftsmanship. The disc suggests the need for a complete recording of the score so that it may be preserved until the glaciers do finally melt — and, hopefully, a long time thereafter.”

    — Matthew Murray, Theatermania.com
  • “One of the Top Ten Cabaret Albums of 2005. This surprise disc…is a winner. Story songs sung with a heartbreaking honesty that comes right from the heart from a master at keeping it real.”

    — John Hoglund, Theatre Scene
  • “…a unique original sound — a combination of Jason Robert Brown in musical sophistication and Jonathan Larson in lyrical purity.”

    — Matthew Murray, Talklinbroadway.com

Leave a review

More from Brian Lane Green…

About

Tony-nominated actor and singer BRIAN LANE GREEN is a talented performer with a broad list of credits in theater, television and film. Tony Award nominee for Best Actor in a Musical for his performance as Spacepunk in Starmites, Green made…